The Decision to Exceed Expectations

The Decision to Exceed Expectations

Continuing with the week’s theme of being a professional, consider what it takes to be a dominant force in any endeavor.

As we watch or play sports, we all know there are victories, and then there are V I C T O R I E S. Being a football fan, last year’s NCAA season gave us some incredible wins: like West Point barely falling to Number five Oklahoma in OT, Stanford’s OT win against Oregon, or LSU’s 7OT Record setting loss to A&M. The close ones that excite and surprise us are worth the price of admission. Then there is utter domination – Florida chomping UT with the most points they’ve ever scored at Neyland and Clemson’s record setting romping of Bama to close the FBS season. We always want the latter for our team.

We will talk about those wonderfully exciting, record breaking wins for years to come. Yet, no matter what sport you follow, you will also always remember the many times a hyped performance does not meet expectations. Super Bowls are often not so super.

https://cercatalent.com/2019/the-decision-to-exceed-expectations-recruiting-news/

The Decision to Exceed Expectations | CERCA Talent+

Continuing with the week’s theme of being a professional, consider what it takes to be a dominant force in any endeavor.

As we watch or play sports, we all know there are victories, and then there are V I C T O R I E S. Being a football fan, last year’s NCAA season gave us some incredible wins: like West Point barely falling to Number five Oklahoma in OT, Stanford’s OT win against Oregon, or LSU’s 7OT Record-setting loss to A&M. The close ones that excite and surprise us are worth the price of admission. Then there is utter domination – Florida chomping UT with the most points they’ve ever scored at Neyland and Clemson’s record-setting romping of Bama to close the FBS season. We always want the latter for our team.

We will talk about those wonderfully exciting, record breaking wins for years to come. Yet, no matter what sport you follow, you will also always remember the many times a hyped performance does not meet expectations. Super Bowls are often not so super.

https://cercatalent.com/2019/the-decision-to-exceed-expectations-recruiting-news/

JUMP Digital Marketing and SEO

Innovative Digital Marketing Strategies To Increase Traffic, Leads, & Conversions

Our digital marketing services are thoughtfully designed to help your brand make a huge impact on the web, beat the competition, and meet its goals. We can ensure your brand gets found and ranked by search engines, increase visibility, and attract organic traffic. Partner with us to reach and engage target audience, generate quality leads, and achieve high conversion rates.

You like SEO, try HEO…Handcrafted Engagement Optimization

We survey all your marketing activity, analyze your target audience and collaborate on a world-class strategy. We will intentionally develop profiles, social media content, unique branded posts and glossy material (as needed) to help you achieve high visibility with compelling copy and images across campaigns.

We purposefully engage across all social channels and target demographics suitable for your business. We establish thoughtful budgets, clear campaign schedules, ca

https://jumpdigitalseo.com/

The Pulse-things to Know About The Flu

words for video below for the hearing impaired.

show me how you do that aha to tissue and probably into your elbow or what else yeah not your hand cuz then you got a touch of people okay you could go into your elbow where you use a tissue to cover your nose and your mouth yeah that would be ideal okay I have learned to do this elbow hits if I are are usually sneeze into my elbow okay kind of the Dracula show me how you sneeze into your elbow into your elbow you know what we call that dad how far can things fly out of our news any idea it’s too far it is far 50 feet sounds outrageous but I’m gonna go with that 15 be back three or four foot I don’t know 10 feet how far about 26 feet you get your flu shots yes I did not didn’t want to know I did not which is bad can the flu shot cause the flu sometimes some people depends on your moon system I think it can’t perhaps well I’m sorry to say I’m probably not no I don’t think so no I think it’s you should present supposed to at least professor good question I don’t know how they told me no that’s right it does not cause me thank you no absolutely not now hand-washing is key to avoid cold and flu how long should we wash our hands work you wanna sing the ABCs backwards how do you do that sing that Argus any direction the ABCs two minutes you should wash it for my seconds singing the ABC’s twice or something happy birthday twice 30 seconds thirty Seconds right 2013 20 and seconds you sing the Happy Birthday song happy birthday thank you very much great thank you okay have a good wine I can ask you a couple more

As found on Youtube

Voices: Living with Schizophrenia

words to video below for the hearing impaired

MICHELLE HAMMER: Hi. I’m Michele Hammer and I have schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a mental illness that changes the way you think, feel, and act. It’s broken down into three separate categories, positive, negative, and cognitive. Positive symptoms don’t mean they’re a good thing. It’s an add-on to your normal behavior, things like hallucinations, delusions, and voices. SPEAKER 1: You know, I had so many ghosts and shadows inside of my mind. SPEAKER 2: A demon was perching on the end of my bed. MICHELLE HAMMER: Negative symptoms take away from your behavior. SPEAKER 3: I showed no emotion and I was just totally out of it. MICHELLE HAMMER: Cognitive symptoms make it hard to pay attention and hard to focus. SPEAKER 4: Your brain is just racing. It can’t stop. SPEAKER 5: The pathology of these illnesses has only become recently understood. MICHELLE HAMMER: Schizophrenia’s different for everyone. My symptoms aren’t like everybody else’s. My first symptom of schizophrenia was pretty much just zoning out, thinking I was in a different place.

Then, it turned into kind of voices in my head. They just plagued me over and over again. I thought my mother was trying to hurt me. I didn’t know what to do about anything, because I thought everyone had it out for me. So I didn’t know who to go to for help. Sometimes I kind of hear a voice more coming from the right side of my head saying, like– Everyone hates you. Stop what you’re doing. Don’t do anything. Nothing. While there’s kind of like the other side of me that’s kind of arguing back with the voice. Don’t worry about anything. Chill. Just chill. Breathe. Chill. Just chill. You can get through it. And it’s kind of just like the thing is who’s gonna win, who’s gonna win, who’s gonna win.

When I take my medicine, the good side wins. I mean, living in the city and having schizophrenia is interesting, just because I do hear voices as I’m walking down the street. So in my head I’m thinking of the person talking to me. But then, I start talking back to the person. And then, maybe I’ll snap out of it, look around, and like five people are staring at me. But mostly I kind of just get plagued by thoughts that are just so repetitive in my head and they just go around over and over and over again, when really you just want them to be nice and quiet and silent.

All through high school, I had this really crazy paranoid delusion that my mother was trying to kill me. Every time she went to try to get me to a therapist or anything, because she knew something wasn’t right, I always thought she was trying to ruin my life. So when I went to college, I thought I was free of her. And everything was great. And then, all of a sudden, my best friend, my roommate, I started thinking the exact same things about her. So realizing that I had the problem was, like, the start of the entire thing. And that was the hardest thing to do, I think, realizing there was a problem.

At 18, I was told I was bipolar. But I kind of knew that diagnosis was incorrect. So at 22, I spoke to a different doctor. And I was more honest with him and he diagnosed me with schizophrenia. And that was like the best thing that ever happened to me, because he got me on the right medication and I feel as good as I can possibly feel right now. SPEAKER 2: I finally told a therapist about what was going on with me. I had all these problems and I finally had a name for them. SPEAKER 6: Over time, we’ve realized that mental illness is nothing more than physical illness.

Talk to as many people as you can. Don’t be ashamed. Don’t be judgmental. MICHELLE HAMMER: I see a psychiatrist every other week. And we just kind of talk about things that are going on. Mostly I just share really silly stories with him and we just laugh a lot, when really he’s measuring just my mood. That’s what I know that he’s doing.

For my medication, I take seven daily medications, six in the morning and one at night. The ones in the morning just get me ready for the day, get me focused, make it so I can get out of bed without having a horrible day. And the one at night just keeps me kind of level, knocks me out, and let me have a good sleep without completely panicking in the middle of the night. SPEAKER 2: It can be very lonely having schizophrenia, the paranoia, the fear, the voices, everything that goes along with it. SPEAKER 5: The compliance with medications is gonna ultimately lead to a recovery and your son or daughter can not only be OK, but they can be great again.

MICHELLE HAMMER: It took a process of almost 10 years to get me on the right medication. But I’m glad that I finally am. People think that just because you’re on medicine that the voices will completely stop. But you just can’t stop the voices. With medication, it’s more positive listening. It’s more just zoning out. As long as I’m not thinking of negative, horrible things. SPEAKER 7: My soul was leaking out of my body. SPEAKER 1: I just saw a human being, empty. MICHELLE HAMMER: I’m good. So you can’t turn the voices off. You can just make them to what you prefer to hear. SPEAKER 1: Be conscious of something that will take your attention from that negative situation into a positive one. And you know, it takes a lot of discipline, but little by little, it becomes a habit. MICHELLE HAMMER: One in five New Yorkers has a mental health issue, but people don’t talk about it, because of all the stigma.

SPEAKER 3: There is still a lot of stigma, but people are starting to understand it a little bit better. MICHELLE HAMMER: Kind of like a big reason why I started my clothing line was that I was on the subway and I looked down the subway train and there was a homeless schizophrenic guy just talking to himself. And I noticed it was the same exact mannerisms as I do it.

So I kind thought to myself, what’s the difference between me and this guy. And I realized if I didn’t have my friends, my family, my doctor I could so easily be in his position. Part of the reason I started my whole business was to just tell everybody that I have schizophrenia. Showing people you can live a completely normal life, medicated, and be a completely normal person. And my whole thing is, if everyone would just kind of tell people that they have a mental illness, there wouldn’t be so much a stigma. There really shouldn’t be any stigma. That needs to go away. Mental illness is so common. How can there be so much stigma? So I kind of wanted to do something that could raise awareness, give back to the mentally ill, homeless community, and just kind of make a difference. Hi. How are you guys doing? Schizophrenic NYC was all made by me, schizophrenic New Yorker, trying to change the way New York City sees mental health, especially the mentally ill homeless. Donate a portion of the profits to help them out.

Yeah. I just pack up my bag. I wheel it over to my shop every Saturday. And I just sell my merch. And I talk to amazing people. Yesterday, I met two people that work in a psych ward. We had the greatest conversation about psych wards. They totally bought something from me and they took my card and they’re like, we love what you’re doing. This is so great. Mental health professionals love what I’m doing.

They always think it’s great. I’ve gotten negative reactions. Like one lady came up to my booth last year and says, I can’t believe you would name a business this. This is offensive and I’m a mental health advocate and this is offensive. And she took my flyer and ran away. And I was like, can I tell you about it. I’m a mental health advocate too. And she just ran away. And I was like, isn’t that stigma? Aren’t you judging me before I even tell you about it? Stigma right there. This shirt’s pretty awesome. It’s not a delusion. You are incredible. Some common questions that I get is what medications are you on. Mostly by people in the mental health field.

They want to know. Other common questions are like how to handle somebody in a crisis. I mean, definitely never tell them that they’re wrong. Don’t try to take away their feelings. You always have to be sympathetic. I would try to convince them that they should seek professional help. Find a good doctor. Find the meds that work. If you try hard enough and you really want to fix it, you can. Don’t take your medication, feel better, and then think you don’t need your medication anymore. It took a lot of pride that I had to say, I need medication and I’m just gonna take it. SPEAKER 2: My advice to someone who’s going through it is be honest. If you keep telling people you’re fine, they’ll believe it. SPEAKER 1: I believe there is a component beyond medical treatment that it has to be with education and creating positive voices that can influence and override the negative ones. SPEAKER 8: Just because they have schizophrenia, doesn’t mean that they can’t be someone who will contribute to society, who can make the world a better place.

.

As found on Youtube